Profs-in-Commons

Profs-in-Commons is part of the Profs-in-Spaces network, a UBC wide project that seeks to increase meaningful engagement between students and professors outside of the classroom. Since fall 2016, the Chapman Learning Commons has been part of the Profs in Spaces community, embedding professors’ office hours in the pavilion spaces (the Learning Lounge and the Centre for Writing and Scholarly Communication) on level 3 of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.

The office hours take place alongside other academic support programs–Science Peer Academic Coaching, Kinesiology Peer Academic Coaching and the Centre for Writing and Scholarly Communication. The intention is that multiple academic supports delivered by a combination of professors, TAs, and student leaders, will lead to innovation in holistic approaches, learning support, and interdisciplinary dialogue.

Regardless of the classes they are teaching, our Profs-in-Commons welcome students from any discipline to stop by.

Map


Office Hours

Learning Lounge | Level 3 | IKBLC

  • 09:00
  • 09:30
  • 10:00
  • 10:30
  • 11:00
  • 11:30
  • 12:00
  • 12:30
  • 13:00
  • 13:30
  • 14:00
  • 14:30
  • 15:00
  • 15:30
  • 16:00
  • 16:30
  • 17:00
  • 17:30

  • Monday
    • Dr. Farah Shroff SPPH 381B, Case-Based Learning
    • Dr. Lior Silberman MATH 100, MATH 412, MATH 449D
    • Dr. Pam Kalas SCIE 001, BIOL 121, BIOL 463
  • Tuesday
  • Wednesday
    • Isobel Mouat SCIE 113
    • Dr. Neil Armitage SOCI 200, SOCI 361
    • Dr. Steve Wolfman CPSC 103
  • Thursday
  • Friday
    • Dr. Pam Kalas SCIE 001, BIOL 121, BIOL 463

Centre for Writing and Scholarly Communication (Writing Pavilion) | Level 3 | IKBLC

  • 09:00
  • 09:30
  • 10:00
  • 10:30
  • 11:00
  • 11:30
  • 12:00
  • 12:30
  • 13:00
  • 13:30
  • 14:00
  • 14:30
  • 15:00
  • 15:30
  • 16:00
  • 16:30
  • 17:00
  • 17:30

  • Monday
    • Dr. Jonathan Otto WRDS 150
  • Tuesday
  • Wednesday
    • Dr. Jonathan Otto WRDS 150
    • Dr. Mi-Young Kim WRDS 150
  • Thursday
  • Friday
    • Dr. Nazih El-Bezre WRDS 150

Our Profs-in-Commons

Dr. Mike Borkent

Dr. Mike Borkent

Mike teaches academic writing and comics studies in the Arts Studies in Research and Writing program. With a background in literature, cognitive studies, and biology, Mike builds interdisciplinarity into his courses, to showcase how knowledge developments and genres vary by discipline, even while sharing interests in works like comics and graphic novels. His research focuses on developing analytical frameworks for multimodal literature (especially comics) through insights from cognitive studies of image and language comprehension, while drawing on a range of other literary and cultural interests.

Dr. Mi-Young Kim

Dr. Mi-Young Kim

Mi-Young Kim earned her Ph.D. in Language and Literacy Education at UBC and M.A. in Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her dissertation topic as well as her main research focus is on academic socialization of second language learners, particularly those who studied English as a foreign language and are from a different academic culture. Her other research and teaching interests include sociolinguistics, especially on the topic of identity and ideology of language learners, academic writing, translation, TESL, English for Academic Purposes (EAP), among many others.

Dr. Jonathan Otto

Dr. Jonathan Otto

Jonathan Otto holds a doctorate in geography with a focus on development and environmental justice. As a Lecturer in Arts Studies in Research and Writing (ASRW), he draws on the concepts of writing situation, genre, and disciplinarity to challenge his students to embrace research and writing as social and political practices.

Dr. Nazih El-Bezre

Dr. Nazih El-Bezre

Nazih El-Bezre has a PhD in Writing Studies from McGill University. His dissertation focused on the social, cultural, and writing experiences of international graduate students in Canadian universities. His research interests include: rhetorical genre theory, writing across the curriculum/in the disciplines, literacy transfer, identity construction, and intercultural rhetoric. His professional experience includes teaching academic writing in the U.S and Canada, translating, tutoring, and developing writing workshops.

Dr. Pam Kalas

Dr. Pam Kalas

Pam is originally from the South of Switzerland and studied biology at the University of Geneva, about five hours West of her hometown. Although for her Master’s she would have really loved to do research on the genetics of dogs, she settled for fruit flies. In 2000, she moved to Vancouver to do her PhD (where she also used the fruit fly as a model organism), and after graduating just never left. Pam has taught a number of courses in the Biology and Science One Programs since 2009, including BIOL121, BIOL140, BIOL234 and 334, BIOL 335, BIOL 337, BIOL463, and the biology component of Science One. She is also an Integrated Sciences mentor and, since last summer, the director of the Combined Major in Science Program. What Pam likes the most about her job is the interaction with students. In Pam’s words “I find that I learn from them as much as they may learn from me!”

Dr. Neil Armitage

Dr. Neil Armitage

Neil did all his studies in Europe, attaining a Bachelors and Masters degree from Uppsala University, and a PhD from Manchester University in the field of cultural cosmopolitanism. Neil is a Lecturer in Sociology at UBC, and this will be his third year as a Prof-in-Commons. In the space, along with TAs, he holds his office hours for SOCI 102 and SOCI 200. When the weather permits, Neil can be found wandering campus with students and fellow profs on a #profwalk, and when not, instructing students how to knit a waterproof toque during ‘Knit n Knatter’. He enjoys going for runs, swimming, and walking his puppy, Polly.

Dr. Steve Wolfman

Dr. Steve Wolfman

Steve is excited to continue his recent trend toward larger and larger spaces to replace the ‘office’ in ‘office hours’. Along with having taught a dozen or so different computing courses, Steve also studies computing education, raises one pre-school and one pre-teen girl, plays board games, cooks, bikes, and wears many T-shirts with wolves on them.

prof- dr lior silberman

Dr. Lior Silberman

I am a mathematician, beginning my twelfth year at UBC. Originally from Israel, I spent eight years as a graduate student and post-doc in the United States before moving to Canada. I am interested in mathematics, broadly construed, including physics and computer science. Talking to people about ideas is one of the best parts of my job, and I hope to do more of that at the library: I’m looking forward to answering questions and holding discussions about coursework, but also about mathematics and science generally and even about topics of general interest such as the relevance of science to our society or the philosophy of phsyics and mathematics. My research spans the gamut from mathematical physics, number theory, and knot theory, all the way to numerical methods for image reconstruction.

Isobel Mouat, Prof in Commons

Isobel Mouat

Isobel is a graduate student teaching SCIE113. As an instructor Isobel emphasizes creating an inclusive classroom and learning with students about how contexts such as politics and culture influence science. As a PhD student in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology she studies how viruses contribute to the autoimmune diseases multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. She hopes that as a graduate student instructor she can share her experience of transitioning from undergrad to graduate school and openly discuss with students their options for the future. In her time outside of the lab and the classroom Isobel likes to run, rock climb, and cook.

Dr Farah Shroff

Dr. Farah Shroff

Dr Farah Shroff works in the Department of Family Practice and the School of Population and Public Health in the UBC Faculty of Medicine; she has also taught courses in the Department of Political Science. The emphasis in her research is on visioning and developing Health for All. Her main areas of research are holistic health, health services research and community development within a social justice framework. Her research is predicated on the notion that all people, regardless of ability to pay, have a right to health and health services. She has an ongoing interest in the role of global social movements in creating better conditions for health. She also has a particular interest in ayurveda, yoga, meditation and other forms of health promotion and disease prevention. Her book, The New Midwifery: Reflections on Renaissance and Regulation, an edited collection, was published in 1997. Since then, Dr. Shroff has written about innovations/transformations in women’s health, HIV/AIDS, health policy, nursing issues, registered massage therapy, global health and more. She also writes poetry and literary reviews. Her teaching style is active, employing movement, theatre techniques, experiential activities and more.
She has a longstanding commitment to global health status improvements and has worked in Kenya, Nigeria, Guatemala, Mexico, Costa Rica, India, Thailand and many other countries. She is the Founder and Lead of Maternal and Infant Health Canada, a collaborative which works to improve the health of women and children through education, research and innovation.

#ProfWalks