Profs-in-Commons

Profs-in-Commons is part of the Profs-in-Spaces network, a UBC wide project that seeks to increase meaningful engagement between students and professors outside of the classroom. Since fall 2016, the Chapman Learning Commons has been part of the Prof in Spaces community, embedding professors’ office hours in the pavilion spaces (the Learning Lounge and the Centre for Writing and Scholarly Communication) on level 3 of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.

The office hours take place alongside other academic support programs–Science Peer Academic Coaching, Kinesiology Peer Academic Coaching and the Centre for Writing and Scholarly Communication. The intention is that multiple academic supports delivered by a combination of professors, TAs, and student leaders, will lead to innovation in holistic approaches, learning support, and interdisciplinary dialogue.

Regardless of the classes they are teaching, our Profs-in-Commons welcome students from any discipline to stop by.

Office Hours

Learning Lounge | Level 3 | IKBLC

  • 09:00
  • 09:30
  • 10:00
  • 10:30
  • 11:00
  • 11:30
  • 12:00
  • 12:30
  • 13:00
  • 13:30
  • 14:00
  • 14:30
  • 15:00
  • 15:30
  • 16:00
  • 16:30
  • 17:00
  • 17:30

  • Monday
    • Dr. Rafael Wainer
      SOCI 320, FMST 210
    • Dr. Ana Vivaldi
      SOCI 371, ANTH 378 by appointment
  • Tuesday
  • Wednesday
    • Dr. Pam Kalas
      BIOL 335
    • Dr. Rafael Wainer
      SOCI 320, FMST 210
    • Dr. Ana Vivaldi
      SOCI 371, ANTH 378 by appoint.
  • Thursday
    • Dr. Pam Kalas
      BIOL 335
  • Friday

Centre for Writing and Scholarly Communication | Level 3 | IKBLC

Term II: July 2 – August 9

  • 09:00
  • 09:30
  • 10:00
  • 10:30
  • 11:00
  • 11:30
  • 12:00
  • 12:30
  • 13:00
  • 13:30
  • 14:00
  • 14:30
  • 15:00
  • 15:30
  • 16:00
  • 16:30
  • 17:00
  • 17:30

  • Monday
  • Tuesday
  • Wednesday
  • Thursday
  • Friday

Our Profs-in-Commons

Dr. Mike Borkent

Dr. Mike Borkent

Mike teaches academic writing and comics studies in the Arts Studies in Research and Writing program. With a background in literature, cognitive studies, and biology, Mike builds interdisciplinarity into his courses, to showcase how knowledge developments and genres vary by discipline, even while sharing interests in works like comics and graphic novels. His research focuses on developing analytical frameworks for multimodal literature (especially comics) through insights from cognitive studies of image and language comprehension, while drawing on a range of other literary and cultural interests.

Dr. Mi-Young Kim

Dr. Mi-Young Kim

Mi-Young is trying out the Learning Commons this year in hopes that this centrally located space will encourage her students in WRDS 150 to come and discuss their writing and research interests more (and early on!). Her research and teaching interests include, but not limited to, academic socialization, sociolinguistics, identity and ideology of language learners, critical pedagogy, academic writing, translation, Teaching English as a Second Language, English for Academic Purposes, among many others. She welcomes inspiring ideas and engaging conversations especially regarding the current topic of her WRDS 150 sections: “Fad, Fashion, and Fit”.

Dr. Jonathan Otto

Dr. Jonathan Otto

Jonathan is a Lecturer in Arts Studies in Research and Writing within the Faculty of Arts.   As a geographer, Jonathan studies the politics of sustainable development initiatives in southern Mexico.  Specifically, he is interested in how dominant development and environmental discourses interact with local conceptualizations of climate change, sustainability and well-being.  Jonathan’s research inspires his work in his WRDS 150 classes where he collaborates with his students to analyze how knowledge is produced and shared within and across academic disciplines.  He also supports his students as they begin to participate in scholarly practices of knowledge production and communication by completing semester-long research and writing assignments.

Dr. Ana Vivaldi

Dr. Ana Vivaldi

I see teaching, research, collaboration, and writing as a continuum. My interests in studying the politics of indigeneity and race in urban spaces (and in particular the way mobility among marginalized populations challenge subordination) informs my teaching on Sociological Theories, Ethnographic Methodologies, Political and Media Anthropology. Conversely, my experience as a popular educator working within rural and indigenous teachers, at Ethnographic Museum of Buenos Aires has shaped the academic interests that motivated to become a researcher. I have a background in ethnographic and digital methodologies, social theories, political anthropology, indigenous studies and media, and I also enjoy walking, biking, swimming as another way of engaging with people and the world.

Dr. Pam Kalas

Dr. Pam Kalas

Pam is originally from the South of Switzerland and studied biology at the University of Geneva, about five hours West of her hometown. Although for her Master’s she would have really loved to do research on the genetics of dogs, she settled for fruit flies. In 2000, she moved to Vancouver to do her PhD (where she also used the fruit fly as a model organism), and after graduating just never left. Pam has taught a number of courses in the Biology and Science One Programs since 2009, including BIOL121, BIOL140, BIOL234 and 334, BIOL 335, BIOL 337, BIOL463, and the biology component of Science One. She is also an Integrated Sciences mentor and, since last summer, the director of the Combined Major in Science Program. What Pam likes the most about her job is the interaction with students. In Pam’s words “I find that I learn from them as much as they may learn from me!”

Dr. Rafael Wainer- Crop

Dr. Rafael Wainer

Rafael is originally from Argentina and has lived in Vancouver for the last 14 years. He is a Doctor in Anthropology with a specialization on medical anthropology. Rafael’s main interests are biomedical knowledge and practices, children’s experience of cancer treatment, end-of-life and palliative care, medical assistance in dying, chronicity and disability, and resilience and hope. Rafael teaches courses in Anthropology, Sociology and Family Studies. Rafael places a great emphasis on creating a teaching and learning environment in which students are not understood as empty vessels that need to be filled with knowledge but rather as co-creators of a shared situated knowledge that from the very first class has to make sense to them. In his free time Rafael likes to play frisbee golf, bike, swim, and get obsessed with NBA basketball.

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